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Martial Arts Articles

Martial and Combat Science

(Examiner.com) – When a high school wrestling coach explains how to execute a hip throw using body position, momentum and leverage to his team of young grapplers; he emphasizes the use of the principles of physics as it applies to grappling in order to execute techniques efficiently.

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Examiner.com, December 12, 2011

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Martial Arts Articles

A Woman’s Jiu-Jitsu Journey from White Belt to Black Belt

(Grapplearts) – In this feature interview I talk with Emily Kwok who is a very smart, very talented jiu-jitsu practitioner.

She’s been involved in the woman’s competition circuit for a long time, having competed both with and without the gi, and in MMA overseas. Her ability as a teacher of jiu-jitsu – to both men and women – is proved every time she steps on the mats at her BJJ Academy in Princeton, NJ.

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Grapplearts, May 14, 2011

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Martial Arts Articles

Body Conditioning – Wrist Training

By conditioning, the body becomes stronger and more resistant, making conditioning an essential part of any self defense discipline.

(YMAA) – If one is to be a true martial artist, one must train their body accordingly to their art. By conditioning, the body becomes stronger and more resistant, making conditioning an essential part of any self defense discipline. When conditioning, we must see all the reasons for which we want to condition. In other words, if you want to train a specific area of the body, you have to know why and for what reasons. How do we get from where we are now, to where we want to be? We need a plan. Only then can we can know what type of conditioning training is needed. So why condition the wrists? Usually, many people will wrap their wrists with cloth, tape, or a support to protect them from being injured. This method makes sense if you are training for fun, or if you are punching the bag for good cardio workout. However, if training for the purpose of self defense, you must train accordingly.

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YMAA, March 28, 2011

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Martial Arts Articles

History of Shaolin Long Fist Kung Fu

(YMAA) – The first Shaolin Buddhist Temple was built in 377 AD on Shaoshi Mountain (少室山) in Deng Feng (登封) county of Henan (河南) province, by order of Emperor Wei (魏). Bodhidharma (菩提達摩), or Da Mo, came to Shaolin from India to teach Buddhism around 527 AD. Additionally, he passed on techniques of strengthening the body and mind, and developing internal energy. The improved body power and health encouraged the monks to develop ways of applying the teachings in self-defense situations against thieves and robbers. Consequently, martial techniques became a required addendum to the monk’ studies.

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YMAA, December 30. 2009

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Martial Arts Articles

Choose Your Weapon: Exotic Martial Arts

(The New York Times) – WHEN it comes to the popularity of judo, tae kwon do and other combat disciplines, the math says it all: Asian martial arts studios in the United States outnumber Dunkin’ Donuts outlets by more than three to one. Black Belt magazine counts some 20,000 studios nationwide and estimates that perhaps two million Americans practice Eastern fighting disciplines weekly or more, said the executive editor Robert Young. Whether for sport or self-defense, Asian martial arts are about as alien as, well, glazed doughnuts.

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The New York Times, April 15, 2009

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Martial Arts Articles

The Legacy of Muslim Kung Fu Masters

A group of school children practice martial arts formation under the watch of their teacher in the Great Mosque of Xi'an.

(Muslim Heritage) – The Legacy of Muslim China is the legacy of Muslim Kung Fu. Muslim Masters have trained continuously and arduously, venturing the never-ending journey towards physical and spiritual perfection, poised by serving a lifelong inspiration to their Muslim communities and the proud nation of China. They have perceptively disseminated their knowledge of the art, unreadily revealed by the ancient masters to only a few truly dedicated students who were allowed a glimpse of a particular technique, after their sincerity and total devotion for the art was thoroughly tested. The high caliber of Muslim Kung fu Masters was deemed with an open mind and excelling to a high degree in both a combative and a philosophical approach.

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Muslim Heritage – April, 2007

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Martial Arts Articles

The Method of Hung Ga’s Ging

In traditional training methods, the practice of throwing the arms while holding stone locks, lifting weights with a stone barbell, and practicing other heavy weapons that weigh in excess of thirty pounds, are referred to as weight strength.

(Kung Fu Magazine) – Normally when people talk about strength, they are referring to a person’s natural power, size and build. When looking at strength in the martial arts, we divide it into two categories: static (still) and active (moving). Examples of static strength are training the horse stance, stretching and hanging the leg, as well as the single finger Zen. Examples of active or moving strength are categorized under speed and weight. In speed strength, all actions like jumping, moving and attacking with the hand, foot or other body part ? are referred to as speed strength. In traditional training methods, the practice of throwing the arms while holding stone locks, lifting weights with a stone barbell, and practicing other heavy weapons that weigh in excess of thirty pounds, are referred to as weight strength.

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Kung Fu Magazine – May, 2006

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Martial Arts Articles

Wing Tsun’s Devastating Long Pole

The WingTsun long pole technique, known in Cantonese as luk dim boon gwun (six-and-a-half point pole), is one of the least understood elements of WingTsun kung fu.

(Kung Fu Magazine) – The WingTsun long pole technique, known in Cantonese as luk dim boon gwun (six-and-a-half point pole), is one of the least understood elements of WingTsun kung fu. Few experts around the world have mastered its form or fighting techniques, let alone its underlying concept, as it is an advanced program of training in WingTsun.

Today there are a multitude of books and videos for sale by different teachers, each claiming to show the original long pole form that was passed down by the late Grandmaster Yip Man. Oddly enough, no two versions look the same! This leaves the observer to wonder which one is the true form taught by the late Grandmaster Yip Man, and which ones were made up by the person selling the book or video. Indeed, how can one discern the authentic from the imitation, and the true expert from the charlatan?

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Kung Fu Magazine – March, 2005