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An informal history of Okinawan Karate

(Martial Arts Guardian) – In England, Chinese martial arts was first practised in what we know as “China Towns” in the main cities. In Okinawa, the same was true and the Okinawan China Town was Kumemura.

One of these Chinese families living in Okinawa was the Cai family, known in Okinawa as the Kojo. Within Kume, the resident families studied and taught Chinese Quan Fa which the local Okinawans called Toshu Jutsu or Tote Jutsu – Chinese hand techniques – which can also be pronounced in a third way as Karate Jutsu. It is Kume that led to Okinawa’s famous relationship with Fuzhou in China.

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Martial Arts Guardian – May 11, 2015

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Martial Arts Articles

Bunbu Ryo Do: The Way of The Karate Martial Scholar

A person who adopts the way of Bunbu ryo do is said to be training his body for war and his mind for peace. In the Okinawa of old, such men were known as bushi, gentlemen warriors.

(YMAA) – In the early part of the twentieth century, when Okinawan karate teachers were first asked to provide names for their karate by the Butokukai in Japan, they struggled to come up with a name that did justice to the martial art they practiced. Many of those from the royal capital, Shuri, settled on poetic sounding names that conjured up the spirit of their homeland; Choshin Chibana (1886–1969) chose the name Kobayashi ryu, the small forest school. While other teachers with a similar lineage later chose comparable names like the young forest school, and the pine forest school, Shobayashi ryu and Matsubayashi ryu respectively, others chose to honor their teacher, or teachers, and in doing so took kanji from their names to give a name to their karate.

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YMAA – March 10. 2014