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Martial Arts News

Whip Staff & Practical Applications Seminar by Master Guo Naihui

Master Guo Naihui is a disciple of Grandmaster Ma Yingda, son of very famous Ma Fengtu (Ma Style Tonbei). He was recently featured in the latest issue of the “Kung Fu Tai Chi Magazine.” Master Guo will be teaching a seminar on Whip Staff “Bian Gan” and its practical applications. This seminar is hosted by the World Fighting Martial Arts Federation (WFMAF).

Date: May 25, 2017

Time: 6:30pm – 8:30pm

Address: 329 Great East Neck Rd., West Babylon NY 11704

Seminar cost: $40 (2 hours)

Video of Master Guo Naihui:

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Martial Arts Videos

Competition Video 2015 Part 3 at US Open Martial Arts Championship

Martial arts competition video with continuous sparring and full contact sparring at the US Open Martial Arts Championship 2015.

To watch more videos, please visit WFMAF’s YouTube channel.

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US Open Martial Arts Championship

Every year, the US Open Martial Arts Championship (USOMAC) attracts hundreds of elite competitors from around the world. They gather here in New York City to compete for medals and cash prizes, with diverse divisions including form competitions (open hand & weapons) in Kung Fu (Northern & Southern), Karate, Contemporary Wushu, Taijiquan, Internal Martial Arts, and Taekwondo, as well as combat competitions in Point Sparring, Continuous Sparring, Ultimate Sanda, Shuai Jiao (Chinese Wrestling), Push Hands, Chi Sao, Short Weapon Sparring, and Arnis Stick Fighting. Our judges are experienced in judging national and international level competitions, and possess extensive knowledge in their martial art discipline, thus ensuring the quality and professionalism of the USOMAC.

The Martial Spirit in Competitions

Organized by the World Fighting Martial Arts Federation (WFMAF), the US Open Martial Arts Championship is an arena which promotes the core values of martial arts: self-discipline, respect for others, and an overall attitude of kindness toward all people. This tournament provides a unique experience for martial artists from around the globe to come together and compete in a friendly atmosphere, to share skills and knowledge, to establish new friendships with those who share the same core values of martial arts, and to express these core values through actions. Come and join us on October 16th and experience for yourself martial spirit hand in hand with one of the premier martial arts tournament events in the East Coast of the United States.

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Martial Arts Videos

Competition Video 2015 Part 2 at US Open Martial Arts Championship

Martial arts competition video with team demo, weapon forms, push hands, and shuai jiao at the US Open Martial Arts Championship 2015.

To watch more videos, please visit WFMAF’s YouTube channel.

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US Open Martial Arts Championship

Every year, the US Open Martial Arts Championship (USOMAC) attracts hundreds of elite competitors from around the world. They gather here in New York City to compete for medals and cash prizes, with diverse divisions including form competitions (open hand & weapons) in Kung Fu (Northern & Southern), Karate, Contemporary Wushu, Taijiquan, Internal Martial Arts, and Taekwondo, as well as combat competitions in Point Sparring, Continuous Sparring, Ultimate Sanda, Shuai Jiao (Chinese Wrestling), Push Hands, Chi Sao, Short Weapon Sparring, and Arnis Stick Fighting. Our judges are experienced in judging national and international level competitions, and possess extensive knowledge in their martial art discipline, thus ensuring the quality and professionalism of the USOMAC.

The Martial Spirit in Competitions

Organized by the World Fighting Martial Arts Federation (WFMAF), the US Open Martial Arts Championship is an arena which promotes the core values of martial arts: self-discipline, respect for others, and an overall attitude of kindness toward all people. This tournament provides a unique experience for martial artists from around the globe to come together and compete in a friendly atmosphere, to share skills and knowledge, to establish new friendships with those who share the same core values of martial arts, and to express these core values through actions. Come and join us on October 16th and experience for yourself martial spirit hand in hand with one of the premier martial arts tournament events in the East Coast of the United States.

Categories
Martial Arts Videos

Competition Video 2015 Part 1 at US Open Martial Arts Championship

Martial arts competition video with master demos, hand forms, and weapon forms at the US Open Martial Arts Championship 2015.

To watch more videos, please visit WFMAF’s YouTube channel.

[imic_button colour=”btn-default” type=”enabled” link=”https://www.youtube.com/c/WfmafOrganization?sub_confirmation=1″ target=”_blank” extraclass=”extra-class” size=””]Subscribe to Our YouTube Channel[/imic_button]

US Open Martial Arts Championship

Every year, the US Open Martial Arts Championship (USOMAC) attracts hundreds of elite competitors from around the world. They gather here in New York City to compete for medals and cash prizes, with diverse divisions including form competitions (open hand & weapons) in Kung Fu (Northern & Southern), Karate, Contemporary Wushu, Taijiquan, Internal Martial Arts, and Taekwondo, as well as combat competitions in Point Sparring, Continuous Sparring, Ultimate Sanda, Shuai Jiao (Chinese Wrestling), Push Hands, Chi Sao, Short Weapon Sparring, and Arnis Stick Fighting. Our judges are experienced in judging national and international level competitions, and possess extensive knowledge in their martial art discipline, thus ensuring the quality and professionalism of the USOMAC.

The Martial Spirit in Competitions

Organized by the World Fighting Martial Arts Federation (WFMAF), the US Open Martial Arts Championship is an arena which promotes the core values of martial arts: self-discipline, respect for others, and an overall attitude of kindness toward all people. This tournament provides a unique experience for martial artists from around the globe to come together and compete in a friendly atmosphere, to share skills and knowledge, to establish new friendships with those who share the same core values of martial arts, and to express these core values through actions. Come and join us on October 16th and experience for yourself martial spirit hand in hand with one of the premier martial arts tournament events in the East Coast of the United States.

Categories
Martial Arts Videos

Competition Highlights at US Open Martial Arts Championship 2015

Martial arts competition highlights at the US Open Martial Arts Championship 2015.

To watch more videos, please visit WFMAF’s YouTube channel.

[imic_button colour=”btn-default” type=”enabled” link=”https://www.youtube.com/c/WfmafOrganization?sub_confirmation=1″ target=”_blank” extraclass=”extra-class” size=””]Subscribe to Our YouTube Channel[/imic_button]

US Open Martial Arts Championship

Every year, the US Open Martial Arts Championship (USOMAC) attracts hundreds of elite competitors from around the world. They gather here in New York City to compete for medals and cash prizes, with diverse divisions including form competitions (open hand & weapons) in Kung Fu (Northern & Southern), Karate, Contemporary Wushu, Taijiquan, Internal Martial Arts, and Taekwondo, as well as combat competitions in Point Sparring, Continuous Sparring, Ultimate Sanda, Shuai Jiao (Chinese Wrestling), Push Hands, Chi Sao, Short Weapon Sparring, and Arnis Stick Fighting. Our judges are experienced in judging national and international level competitions, and possess extensive knowledge in their martial art discipline, thus ensuring the quality and professionalism of the USOMAC.

The Martial Spirit in Competitions

Organized by the World Fighting Martial Arts Federation (WFMAF), the US Open Martial Arts Championship is an arena which promotes the core values of martial arts: self-discipline, respect for others, and an overall attitude of kindness toward all people. This tournament provides a unique experience for martial artists from around the globe to come together and compete in a friendly atmosphere, to share skills and knowledge, to establish new friendships with those who share the same core values of martial arts, and to express these core values through actions. Come and join us on October 16th and experience for yourself martial spirit hand in hand with one of the premier martial arts tournament events in the East Coast of the United States.

Categories
Martial Arts Videos

Martial Arts Sparring at US Open Martial Arts Championship 2013

Martial arts sparring broadcast at the US Open Martial Arts Championship 2013.

To watch more videos, please visit WFMAF’s YouTube channel.

[imic_button colour=”btn-default” type=”enabled” link=”https://www.youtube.com/c/WfmafOrganization?sub_confirmation=1″ target=”_blank” extraclass=”extra-class” size=””]Subscribe to Our YouTube Channel[/imic_button]

US Open Martial Arts Championship

Every year, the US Open Martial Arts Championship (USOMAC) attracts hundreds of elite competitors from around the world. They gather here in New York City to compete for medals and cash prizes, with diverse divisions including form competitions (open hand & weapons) in Kung Fu (Northern & Southern), Karate, Contemporary Wushu, Taijiquan, Internal Martial Arts, and Taekwondo, as well as combat competitions in Point Sparring, Continuous Sparring, Ultimate Sanda, Shuai Jiao (Chinese Wrestling), Push Hands, Chi Sao, Short Weapon Sparring, and Arnis Stick Fighting. Our judges are experienced in judging national and international level competitions, and possess extensive knowledge in their martial art discipline, thus ensuring the quality and professionalism of the USOMAC.

The Martial Spirit in Competitions

Organized by the World Fighting Martial Arts Federation (WFMAF), the US Open Martial Arts Championship is an arena which promotes the core values of martial arts: self-discipline, respect for others, and an overall attitude of kindness toward all people. This tournament provides a unique experience for martial artists from around the globe to come together and compete in a friendly atmosphere, to share skills and knowledge, to establish new friendships with those who share the same core values of martial arts, and to express these core values through actions. Come and join us on October 16th and experience for yourself martial spirit hand in hand with one of the premier martial arts tournament events in the East Coast of the United States.

Categories
Martial Arts News

Essence of Lien Bu Chuan: Authors Collaborate to Preserve Traditional Chinese Martial Arts Form

The Essence of Lien Bu Chuan: Authors Collaborate to Preserve Traditional Chinese Martial Arts Form

Hi folks,

Our book is finally published! After three years in the making we’re ready to share the news, and ask you to do the same by forwarding this announcement to your contacts, and spreading the news on Facebook and wherever else you can.

The Continuous Steps Form (Lien Bu Chuan) was chosen as one of the required forms to study by the Central Martial Arts Academy in China, which was organized circa 1928. Our book, Essence of Lien Bu Chuan, hand illustrated by Master Nelson Tsou Yen Kai, is a detailed movement by movement study of the form, showing hand and foot motion lines, front, side and overhead views, plus additional interesting details and enhancements. The form study section presents each movement in a two page spread format for ease of understanding.

To see a preview of our book, please click on either of the links below, then choose preview. Until January 31, 2016, copies will be available at a special friends and family discount price of ten dollars off retail. so if you’d like a copy for your own library or as a unique gift, you can order right from that page. After that date, the price will go to full retail.

Link to softcover edition: http://www.blurb.com/b/6626248-essence-of-lien-bu-chuan-continuous-steps-form-sof

Link to hardcover edition: http://www.blurb.com/b/6626874-essence-of-lien-bu-chuan-continuous-steps-form-har

A collaborative effort by Master Tsou, Artie Aviles, and James Man Chin, Essence of Lien Bu Chuan is the result of our desire to preserve the traditional forms of the Northern Shaolin Long Fist Style of Kung Fu. Whether you’re a student of the Martial Art’s or not, when you forward this message, you’ll be helping us achieve that goal, and you never know who one of your emails will reach when you ask your friends and family to pass on our message as well.

Thanks so much for your help,
James Chin, Jett-man

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Martial Arts News

The WFMAF’s President Attended the 10th Year Anniversary Ceremony for the Establishment of Born-2-Win Martial Arts under Sensei Juan Jimenez

The WFMAF's President Attended the 10th Year Anniversary Ceremony for the Establishment of Born-2-Win Martial Arts under Sensei Juan JimenezThe ceremony was hosted this Saturday, July 11, 2015 by Sensei Jimenez, the founder of Born-2-Win Martial Arts, and his black belt students in Richmond Hill, NY. At the ceremony, the WFMAF’s president awarded to Sensei Jimenez a certificate of appreciation, with a letter of congratulation, for his contribution to the growth of martial arts in the greater NY community. Also in attendance are Assemblyman Mike Miller, NY State Senator Joseph P. Addabbo, Jr.

Born-2-Win Martial Arts is built on Shotokan karate, Arinis, Northern Kung Fu and Boxing. Their self-defense system is designed so a person of small stature can defeat a large attacker. Which makes their system very attractive and useful for women and children. Their training consists of specialized classes that focus on the complete development of one’s physical, mental and emotional strengths and skills.

Sensei Jimenez

Founder of Born-2-Win Martial Arts
-3rd degree black belt
-2 time inductucee into the USA Martial Arts Hall of Fame
-Over 30 years experience
-Holds a doctorate in Martial Arts Philosophy

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Martial Arts Articles

One’s Journey in the Learning of Tai Chi and Kung Fu

My introduction to Tai Chi principles came long before I ever heard of or saw any Tai Chi. In the early 1990’s, I was in my 40’s and a neighbor bought a ranch with some horses included in the sale. None of us knew how to ride or care for horses, so we learned together. In order to approach a new horse, you have to go quietly, slowly and yet have confidence. When mounting him, you must make contact with his mane or neck, slowly move your leg over the top and sit down gently. If you don’t, he will dance or bolt. Once seated in that nice “horse stance”, you must remember to not pinch your knees in or grip too tight with the legs, or it will lift your seat and give him the signal to run. When he does take off into a gallop and you haven’t yet learned to control the speed, the biggest mistake you can make is to use muscle. A human, even a large man, is no match for 1000 pounds of horse. You must instead, use 4 ounces of movement in your fingers to zigzag his head and turn him into smaller and smaller circles until he slows down.

Does any of this sound like Tai Chi?

The hardest thing to learn about riding was the control of the mind and fear. One freezing cold winter we were out in the park and I spotted some ice in the center of the trail. I should have trusted the horse, but my fear got the better of me and I steered him around and we slipped and fell. I was on bottom, him on top. My leg and ankle were shattered to dust. The surgeons and rehabilitation people said I would never be stable enough to walk on sand, bend my ankle enough to walk up stairs, and would probably limp for the rest of my life. My friend carried me to my first Tai Chi class and I practiced most of that year in a cast and brace. That first teacher, Mr. Lee, was a British engineer and approached everything very technically. We had to move without bouncing, breathe without sound, look without appearing to see in addition to ending every form in the exact spot we started. There was very little push hands and no instruction in applications.

When Mr. Lee closed his classes, I met my next teacher, Shifu Joseph Laracuenta. Joe is a Puerto Rican baseball player who loves all the martial arts. He wants to share his love with everyone he meets and he does it generously and most times without payment. From him I learned confidence. He takes students on their second class and drags them out into the center of the room and says “Show me your form”. Even if they only remember to step out left and lift their hands, Joe encouragers them and tells them what a great job they are doing. He came to my house for months to coach me for my first tournament, which was run by Master Li Tai Liang in Queens.

He would never accept money and only wanted a promise to practice. Joe instilled in me a love of tai chi and the people I met in his classes. At the same time, I was taking some qigong classes with Shifu George Masone and some workshops with Master Sam SF Chin. I couldn’t get enough. I was taking classes 4-5 days a week and teaching some basic classes in my own little space.

In 2007 I was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was not a good year for me. Five surgeries, seven months of chemotherapy, and 30 radiation treatments in a row. Joe, George and their students, my friends, Mike, Cathy, Isabel, Merrill and Mario got me through. Joe taught me sword and fan form to combat the joint damage from the chemo. They gave me reikii, massage, did countless hours of qigone with me. George taught me how to “Fly Under The Radar” while on the radiation table. It was a mind meditation that allowed the radiation to hit the cancer and not burn the rest of my cells. He would have his entire class do Soaring Crane for weeks on end to get my lymph flowing.

After I recovered from that awful year, George began to tell me to study with Master Li. I was afraid. All I knew about Kung Fu was from the martial arts movies. Lots of fighting, hacking, stabbing and killing. George was in the Army and sometimes taught class in his camouflage uniform. I was very afraid.  But, thank goodness, he finally convinced me to try.

In the summer of 2010 I took my first Xinyi Dao class. From Master Li I learned some Tai Chi, Bagua, Xinyi and Shaolin forms and principles. But most of all I learned that the important thing about the practice is developing health and helping other people. I have watched him spend his own time, energy and money in teaching and helping people at all levels. He shares his art, his food, his jacket. What student hasn’t gone out of the door on a freezing night and heard his voice telling you to put on more clothes. If you don’t have more, he takes off his own coat and gives them to you.

I think the most important thing about learning any Kung Fu is to practice with a sincere heart as Joe would say, go with the flow as George would say and help each other as Master Li tells us every class. More people need to learn the arts early in life as preventive medicine, then maybe we wouldn’t hear people saying, “I came to Tai Chi because my back is hurt, my knees are sore, I have injuries from hard arts, falls from horses, or accidents”. My wish is that all people learn the principles, including how to manage fear and stress. My thanks are to all the people, friends, strangers, students and teachers who have helped me all these years.

Nancy Fiano

July 21, 2015

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Martial Arts News

Learning San Shou from Grandmaster Li Tai Liang

(Examiner.com) – San Shou or Sanda is a Chinese self-defense system and combat sport. San Shou is a martial art which was developed by the Chinese military based upon traditional Kung Fu and modern combat and fighting techniques; it consists of full-contact punches, kicks, wrestling, takedowns, throws, sweeps, kick catches, and in some competitions, even elbow and knee strikes.

Click here to read more

Examiner.com – May 16, 2012